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Totoro: My Fluffy Friend

Published on 07 Mar 2016 / by: Mel

Hello, Monday! Hello, you! Has Monday treated you well so far? I hope it has and I hope the rest of the week would be great as well.

If it hasn't been well for you though, I know just the movie to end your day on a great note: My Neighbor, Totoro. This movie would rejuvenate you as a spa in Bali would do. I promise you these things. It will be like a great rain, washing away your tired souls. Your heart will believe again. Your mind, renewed. And your soul, it will finally understand that the most important things in life are found within you. 

I won’t say much about Hayao Miyazaki’s work this time because you really got to see it for yourself. Even though it is an animation, don’t mistake it for some childish cartoons. It is far from being one.

To sum it up, Brande Aishe wrote it best:

“What’s most fascinating about My Neighbor Totoro is how it portrays the two young girls, who are allowed to just be girls. They are not one-dimensional “plot moppets”: they are giggly and irreverent, quick to temper and even quicker to forgive, prone to worry about the unknown as much as they revel in the relatively careless freedom of youth. In other words, just as delightful and complicated as children truly are.

Totoro depicts that storied “magic of childhood” in both figurative and literal ways. The girls encounter spirits which, according to Nanny, can only been seen through the innocent eyes of a child, and when they tell adults what they have seen, they are not ridiculed or chided, but believed. There’s no cynical twist to the story, no doubt that the girls’ experiences with Totoro are as real as the things that happen in their everyday lives. It’s ALL real, without question. And that’s part of what makes Totoro so very special, because it allows us to embrace that belief wholeheartedly and share a small bit of that magic.” (Brande Aishe http://trueclassics.net/2015/08/02/visiting-my-neighbor-totoro/)

When you can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, it is extremely difficult to keep your mind sane and your heart hopeful. My Neighbor, Totoro, has taught me to see life through the eyes of a hopeful child once again.

 

 

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